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20121201
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Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
they have always. and what i'm trying to do is do it what russell recommendation once awhile you have to hang a question mark on things you come to believe for a long time. >> thomas woods, what's the difference in your mind between the conservative and libertarian? >> well, this is a tricky one as i really -- my heart is on the table here. i feel like i have sympathy in both camps. i identify myself as a libertarian. libertarian has one basic principle which is nonaggression. you cannot initiate force against anybody else. i think a lot of people would agree with that. it's wrong to clock your neighborhood over the head. libertarians will take it to the logical. they involve initiation of violence against people who themselves who have not initiated. we would consider it to be legitimate. a conservative is less i guess id logical. conservative is deliberately or at least in the classical sense in edmund burke is not systematic. they have good reasons for being nonsystematic. life is too con flex. or to be reducible to left liberal most trum we have impose on the whole world. life is
in the pension office for many years and in 1861 there was a new co-worker named john brooks russell. if you read a colored man's reminiscences of james madison and the entire memoir is included as an appendix in my book you will see that it starts with a preface. and intelligent colored man who works in the department of the interior. he was an eye witness to important history and i thought his recollections worth writing down in almost his own words. paul jennings was himself litter and learned to read and write as a slave. i discovered j.d. are was john brooks russell. he was the one who submitted to a history magazine in 1863 and two years later it was published as a slim volume by the same name with jennings's by line on the title page. there were very few copies ever printed. i am thankful that it was not altogether lost to history. it has been quoted by historians over the years especially the passages about the war of 1812 and we are celebrating the 200th anniversary of that war today. jennings had an exciting wartime adventures as he came of age and played a major role in helping madison
stringers, if you will. contemporaries at chambers and russell kirk as well. richard weaver represented the other two strands of it. but until the 70's probably communism was the dominant thing. something i have wondered about is, when ronald reagan was elected, whether, as you look at the history of the conservative movement, anti-communist and became much less of a deal, and i wonder if with ronald reagan the people that were anti-communist felt that they now have this anti-communist and charged it was the commander-in-chief and felt comfortable enough letting him fight communism that they did not need to put the same amount of emphasis into it that they had an focus turned to other things. anyway, so let's turn for a few minutes to where the movement yesterday after anti communism. of course we have had 20-25 years since communism to figure out where the conservative movement goes, but there are certainly, i think, some things that are different but a great many things of the same. basically, the tenants of conservatism with the same as they were when they first -- when people first
russell came. at the question about question about the neighbor cat may. september 11 we were allegedly attacked for -- in the wars in islam is war for but i noticed as far as the naval expansion in the past 11 years, there has been a lot more further people's republic of china and the string of pearls strategy into the indian ocean. pakistan is some most important city you have never heard of because the chinese got a post there to listen to ships going in and out of the straight of hormuz and they also have resource relationships with iran and sudan. and as i think you all know, records of those countries and how they tend to make war on their neighbors and also we have the china daily newspaper. its total propagandpropagand a for the peoples of china and i'm wondering, i think the chinese sold the ideas of -- which you might've studied at the naval academy but i'm wondering, in the next few years, with their lower number of ships and sequestration threat over us and the current expansion of chinese power, how would you best manage our military resources around the world? [laughter] >
; maya, age 9, and russell, age 7. but in january 1973, he began -- elmo began feeling ill. and i detail the fight, the struggle to try to find a cure for elmo's life. but it was in december of 1992 when bud zumwalt went to a renaissance weekend, and this is what i'll close on, where his handwritten note that no one has ever seen except outside of the family -- and i use it in the book. in his handwritten notes that were presented at renaissance, bud reflected on elmo's life, his death, and bud's own struggle for the truth. and to find out what had happened and where the cover-up occurred. i want to read to you what he shared with his second family. because the zumwalt family knows that bud zumwalt considered the renaissance family his second family in so many ways. and he loved, he loved going there. it was a chance to reflect b and be intellectually challenged and to be amongst friends. and this is what bud zumwalt said. under the title, whoops, mistakes and their consequences. as many of you know, i was the commander of u.s. naval forces in vietnam who decided in 1968 to use agent ora
to begin with. bertrand russell. it was obvious. we already knew it. and then my next page wasn't about how the babylonians invented the 360-degree angle. how did i know that? because it was in the history of philosophy. it was everywhere. so i was about to write on and i thought oh, if eric is going to read this book, i want him to feel what it is like to be a babylonian. to feel what it's like to be a babylonian, i have to put that in your hands. and to make you feel what it's like to have this in your hands, i have to find out if that's made of clay or wood or copper. so for a month, i pursued the question of whether a protractor is made of clay or copper or wood. and i couldn't find it. somewhere in the back of my mind, this happens every day and you go, you amazing idiot, how could he you be so stupid, you are following up this obsession about this. get on with the book. you know you have to say. go write it. as you can literally go through hundreds and sometimes thousands of research in the day, after going through tens of thousands of sources, why was i not able to find a babylonian
and their russell banks and, you know, their peter goldens and their judy barnes. they do love their local authors, and they do support their local authors. but on the whole albany's a good, a very -- they're a very voracious group of readers. one of the real calling cards here is, um, is our staff picks section. and we're all voracious readers, and people come in, and they have a certain amount of money to spend, they have a certain amount of time to devote to reading, and they don't really want to spend a lot of time taking a gamble on a book that they might not like. so staff picks is a section today go to immediately to find books that they like that margie read or julia read or susan taylor red, and then they -- read, and then they come back and say i really like her selections, i want to read another book like the one i just read. susan taylor's the one to guide me. and so it's a, you know, our communication with our readers that come in here is very intimate. we know what they like, and they know what we like. it used to be that you could run an independent bookstore just on love, but you c
and their richard russo's and their russell banks and you you know y are peter golden's and their judy lawrence' and they do love their local authors and they do support their local authors but on the whole albany is a very voracious group of readers. one of the real calling cards here is our staff recommends section. we are all voracious readers and people come in and we have a certain amount of money to spend and they have a certain amount of time to devote to reading in the really don't want to spend a lot of time taking a gamble on a book that they might not like. so they go to it immediately to find books that they like that margie has read rector jill you read and then they come back and say, i really liked her selection and i want to read another book like the one that she read. susan taylor is the one so our communications with our leaders is very intimate. we know what we like. it used to be that you could run an independent bookstore just on love, but you can't any more. you have to be business minded first and foremost because you are not going to get any of the rest of it unless you
to william kennedy's and richard russo's and russell bay in their peter goldenson judy barnes. they do love their local authors than they do support local authors. but they are very purchased grouper readers. one of the real calling cards here is our staff section. we are all voracious readers. people come in and have a certain amount of money to spend, a certain amount of time to devote to reading and they don't really want to spend a lot of time taking a gamble on a book that they might not like. so at the section they go to immediately to find books that day like that marquee read or julia brad or susan taylor met. then they come back and say i like her selection but i want to read another book like the one i just read. susan taylor is the one to guide me. so it's our communication with the readers that come in here is very intimate. we know what they like and they know what we like. they used to be that you could run an independent bookstore just on life. but you can't anymore. you have to be business minded first and foremost because you're not going to get any of the rest of it unless
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)

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